»radiantdevices« & Chandeliers & Psychic TV July 22 2016 at Reggie’s, Chicago

Last night’s show was 3 bands in a bar [ »radiantdevices« & Chandeliers & Psychic TV ] with 200+ people listening & singing & dancing. »radiantdevices«had an amazing set, it’s fantastic when we play with live cello and more found-percussion, & the visuals worked quite well in the space. Chandeliers’ analog synth sounds with analog video synthesis projection was the perfect band to watch on Martin Gore’s birthday.  There were technical shenanegans, this was a running around putting out fires & pulling it together with no spare minutes &

& Genesys B-P, after Psychic TV’s opening song, said the important thing. “There are people out there – we know who, don’t need to say who – loudly actively bringing more hate in to the world right now. That’s what they do. Don’t play their game. Be happy.”

Invest in your joy my friends. As David Lynch put it so well, “What we pay attention to, that becomes lively”

still, test for backing visuals "DIRTY"

still, test for backing visuals “DIRTY” a song dealing with the experience of street harassment. processing & quartz composer linked by syphon server.

Where the f did Monday go?

Good evening, dear friends.

This week I was supposed to tell you about showing a one-minute film in cultural institutions around the globe in December, and, new looks in live projection, and, how cool it was to do a »radiantdevices« show on David Bowie’s birthday last Friday. How a few of us improvised a goofy cover of Ziggy Stardust and were so happy even though it was silly and Zack’s first mic failed. As Zack Violet [ the singer for that moment ] put it, “This is kindof rough, but, if there was no David Bowie there wouldn’t be a me!”

I lost Monday to a surprising number of tears, once I’d learned he’d died. I’ve listened to his music for over thirty years. At times his was the only music I listened to for months at a time. In many ways he made the world safer for me. His work invited me to take certain risks; his longevity, and his commitment to the artwork, to persist.

Aesthetically, for me his cutup/assemblage lyricism and archetype-roulette slots alongside that of William Burroughs. Both Bowie and Burroughs are important to me as pop culture links to DaDa and side doors to the dreamt, the sur-real, what I’ve nicknamed “the imaginarium”.

One artist-friend said he’s “considering what of the work Bowie’s left for us, that I can take up, that fits with what I do”.

This link is to the isolated vocal track of Bowie’s original recording of Ziggy Stardust.

The second link, to a concert I watched live on VH1 when I was in graduate school, a few weeks after September 11, 2001.http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=984_1315755315

Behind that second link I wonder if you might hear what I hear – a tremendous spirit of intimacy and connection, a big folk-hippy heart singing out from under the sleek, produced surface. He sang in a moment of our great darkness and difficulty. He knew that the audience looks for an image of itself in the media it consumes. He chose to cover “America” by Simon and Garfunkel. On some level he gave us an undamaged image of our country, instead of the smoky wound we’d all just fallen into.

This example is, I think, one of his challenges to artists.

Because I’m supposed to tell you, well, there’s another »radiantdevices« show coming up, February 12 at Chicago’s Metro.

But besides that, I’d love to hear from you, with links to your favorite Bowie thing – movie or music or interview etc – if you have one to share.

Thanks for being here, and reading my notes.

Jessica

PS: the subject line of this post quotes a lyric from DB’s newest album, Blackstar.